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A talented scholar, John Boswell utilized his knowledge of 17 languages in his studies, including Ancient Greek, Catalan, Latin, Church Slavonic, Old Icelandic, classical Armenian, Syriac, Persian and Arabic. Hugh Steers was an accomplished artist from Washington, DC who chronicled the AIDS epidemic. Michael D. Palm was the captain of the volleyball team and attended Yale on a full scholarship, graduating in 1973 with a degree in English. In August 1972, Warren P. Smith published a story in the Yale Lit — an intricate vignette about an unhappy Chicago woman who follows her husband to New York on a winter business trip. Frank Moore was a painter and founding member of Visual AIDS, one of the most important groups of AIDS activists in the art world. In 1985, Mark Dallas Butler got a job in the registrar’s office at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum and moved from D.C. into an apartment with friends in Astoria, Queens. Jim Brudner established a prize at Yale that honors individuals who have “made significant contributions to the understanding of LGBT issues or furthered the tolerance of LGBT issues.” John Wallace was born in Princeton, New Jersey on July 22, 1960. José Vigo was born in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico and was a doctoral candidate in Anthropology. In the summer of 1964, immediately after receiving his BA in Economics, Nate Marinuzzi married Eleanor Hugo, a librarian at Sterling Memorial Library whom he had dated as an undergraduate. In all, Harry Kondoleon published 18 plays, two novels and two books of poetry. From Cambridge, James Snead moved to West Germany, where he did a stint in finance working at the Frankfurt branch of Chase Manhattan Bank. A respected author, Paul Monette wrote thirteen books, or “glib and silly little novels” as he called them, before he died in 1995 at the age of 49. Jack Winkler was the sole faculty member to help organize Yale’s first Gay Rights Week.

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